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Sarah Fuller: And perhaps in me someone very old still hears the living sound of wood


  • OAG Annex 110 Laurier Avenue West Ottawa, ON, K1P 1J1 Canada (map)
Sarah Fuller Panorama, Old Tree, 2017, Archival Inkjet Print, 120” x 43”, Courtesy of the artist. 

Sarah Fuller
Panorama, Old Tree, 2017, Archival Inkjet Print, 120” x 43”, Courtesy of the artist. 

Sarah Fuller
And perhaps in me someone very old still hears the living sound of wood¹


On view: August 18 – September 24, 2017
OAG Annex, 110 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa

Opening Reception: Thursday August 24, 2017, 5:30 – 7:30 pm

A landscape, a record – carved out, reverberating through time and timber. 

In the 19th century the old growth white pine trees of the Ottawa valley were logged extensively and shuttled downriver for export. Driven by the British Navy’s demand for lumber, the wholesale extraction and shipment of ancient trees across the Atlantic Ocean was a tangible manifestation of a colonial ideology that laid the foundation for Canada as a nation.

I think of those trees often. What did it feel like to bob down river and roll across the sea?  What did they look like – what did this land look like with them in it?

What a loss this is.

In this exhibition I use photography, video, sound and installation to create space in which to meditate on the trees that were once here and the persistent mark their extraction has left on the current landscape.

- Sarah Fuller

Sarah Fuller holds a BFA from Emily Carr University and is currently an MFA candidate at the University of Ottawa. She has completed residencies at the Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, Yukon, Fondazione Antonio Ratti, Italy, and the Association of Visual Artists (SIM), Iceland.  Recent exhibitions include Camouflage (Hulinhjálmsteinn) at Christine Klassen Gallery, Future Station: The 2015 Alberta Biennial at the Art Gallery of Alberta and See Attached at the University of Lethbridge Art Gallery. Her work is held in public and private collections including the Canada Council for the Arts Art Bank, the Department of Foreign Affairs, and the Walter Phillips Gallery. Sarah’s work is concerned with investigating and uncovering multiple histories and narratives of place. Her practice is primarily project-based and often involves working with archives as a means to investigate hidden or obscured narratives.

In partnership with the Department of Visual Arts, University of Ottawa

 

¹Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, translated by Richard Howard (New York: Hill and Wang, 1993), pg. 15.